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GW Law Library
Research Guides

Library Tour

A virtual tour of the GW Law Library is provided.

First Floor

Jacob Burns Law Library Main Entrance

The Library is located on 20th Street between G & H Streets, NW.  
Hours of operation are posted on the Services @ the Jacob Burns Law Library.

The Law Library provides information assistance to the GW Law faculty, students and staff as well as students, faculty and staff of the University who need to use the Law Library's resources to conduct legal research.  We also encourage GW Law alumni and Friends of the Jacob Burns Law Library to use our services.  Please ask us if you have a question about legal research or about library services and operations. The Law Library's access policy is available on the Services @ the Jacob Burns Law Library guide.

The Jacob Burns Law Library follows University policies on wearing masks.  Please see GW Coronavirus University Updates for more information on University policies.

Masks must be worn at all times.  The library does not permit food/eating in the library; beverages are permitted but masks may only be removed briefly to drink.  Prolonged periods of mask removal to drink are not permitted.  Hand sanitizers and wipes are located throughout the Library.  Please make use of them!

 

Circulation/Reserve Desk

Circulation staff are available to assist patrons with obtaining Course Reserve materials and checking out Mac and PC chargers, chargers for phones and iPads, bike locks, and study aids, including Nutshells and Examples and Explanations. Staplers, an electric three-hole punch, and electric pencil sharpener also are available.

Circulation Desk Circulation Desk Map

Stairwell to Stockton Cellar

Stairs located to the right as you come through the 1st floor Library turnstiles take you to the Stockton Cellar.

 

Hallway to Reference Commons

From the Circulation/Reserve Desk, a short hallway displays rare books and current faculty publications, and leads to the Reference Commons and Reference Services Desk.

 

Printing Station

A WEPA printing station is located in a small alcove to the right as you enter through the Library turnstiles.  A 3-hole punch and paper cutter also are available in the alcove.

 

Reference Services

Librarians are available to provide assistance to patrons in-person, by phone, chat, or email

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Reference Commons

Research computers in the Reference Commons are used for searching legal research databases and JACOB, the Law Library's catalog.  Please sanitize the computer keyboard and mouse before using.

Located in the far corner of the Reference Commons is a WEPA printing station.  A small reference collection includes legal encyclopedias and dictionaries, thesauri, manuals, and legal biographical directories.

Masks must be worn at all times.  The library does not permit food/eating in the library; beverages are permitted but masks may only be removed briefly to drink.  Prolonged periods of mask removal to drink are not permitted. 

 

Tasher Reading Room

Quiet study space. Masks must be worn at all times.  The library does not permit food/eating in the library; beverages are permitted but masks may only be removed briefly to drink.  Prolonged periods of mask removal to drink are not permitted.  Hand sanitizers and wipes are located throughout the Library.  Please make use of them!

 

Rare Book Room

The Rare Book Room displays only a small portion of the Library's more than 35,000 rare books, incunabula, manuscripts, and archival material. The collection's original foundation of early Anglo-American legal works and international materials acquired from the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace has expanded in recent times thanks to donations, major purchases at international auctions, and continuing selection of materials from antiquarian booksellers worldwide. Today the collection is noted especially for its Continental materials, with particular strength in French legal history.