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Library Tour

Burns Law Library Main Entrance

Welcome to the Burns Law Library. The Library is located on 20th Street between G & H Streets, NW.

 

Circulation/Reserve Desk

Circulation staff are available to assist patrons with obtaining Course Reserve materials and checking out Mac and PC chargers, chargers for phones and iPads, bike locks, and study aids, including Nutshells and Examples and Explanations. Staplers, an electric three-hole punch, and electric pencil sharpener also are available.

 

Colonial Printing Station

Colonial Printing stations are located in the room to the right after entering through the Library turnstiles. Staplers, an electric three-hole punch, and a shredder are also located in the room.

 

 

 

Stairwell to Stockton Cellar

Stairs located to the right as you come through the 1st floor Library turnstiles take you to the Stockton Cellar, where the scanners are located.

 

Hallway to Reference Commons & Reference Desk

From the Circulation/Reserve Desk, a short hallway displays rare books and current faculty publications, and leads to the Reference Commons and Reference Desk.

 

Reference Desk

Librarians are available to provide assistance to patrons at the Reference Desk (Library 1st floor) in-person or by phone, chat, or email

Reference Commons

Research computers in the Reference Commons are used for searching legal research databases and JACOB, the Law Library's catalog. A small reference collection includes legal encyclopedias and dictionaries, thesauri, manuals, and legal biographical directories. Drinks allowed, but no food permitted.

 

Tasher Reading Room

Quiet study space. Drinks allowed, but no food.

 

Rare Book Room

The Rare Book Room displays only a small portion of the Library's more than 35,000 rare books, incunabula, manuscripts, and archival material. The collection's original foundation of early Anglo-American legal works and international materials acquired from the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace has expanded in recent times thanks to donations, major purchases at international auctions, and continuing selection of materials from antiquarian booksellers worldwide. Today the collection is noted especially for its Continental materials, with particular strength in French legal history.

 

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